L’Occitane review – bringing Braille labels to visually impaired customers

After hearing that there were Braille labels on some of the L’Occitane products, I decided to find out more about them, and also to try some of the products myself. Braille is a tactile reading system used by blind people. It consists of patterns of raised dots which form the letters or groups of letters.

I was interested to know why the company had decided to use Braille labels, and I was also keen to try out some new products – a recurring theme on this blog!

Background information

According to Sophie OLIVER, Group PR and Communications Manager, “as a sensorial brand, L’Occitane chooses to support the visually impaired by offering braille on most of its packaging. L’Occitane has always sought to make its products available to a broad spectrum of the population and the blind represent a category of people for whom access to consumer goods is often very difficult..

“The inspiration for having Braille on the packaging came from Company Founder, Olivier Baussan. In the 1990’s, Olivier was visiting a L’Occitane store and at the same time a blind man was shopping. Olivier witnessed the difficulty the man had choosing his products and from that day began the commitment to have Braille on L’Occitane packaging.”

I found this fascinating because as someone who shops online, I wouldn’t think of using Braille packaging to pick out my products. It does, however, help a lot in terms of identifying the products once I’ve got them home. I admit, this wouldn’t be so hard if I didn’t have such a ridiculous amount of cosmetic and skincare products, but that’s a choice that I made! It occurs to me that the labels help people in a way that Olivier Baussan hadn’t even thought of. Having said that, not all blind people are as fond of online shopping as I am, and I can definitely see how being able to identify the products whilst still in the shop would help.

The products that I tested

I tried five L’Occitane products. Two of them had Braille labels stuck directly to the bottles, in fact these were the two that are used in the bath or shower, so it makes sense that they wouldn’t be kept in their cardboard boxes. The other three came in boxes with Braille on the side. I usually bin boxes for products straight away, but I kept them because of the Braille!

My favourite out of the products I tried was the shea light comforting face cream. It smelled good, and is a lovely, light moisturiser. I’ve been using it at the moment, but I could imagine this as a light and refreshing product for the summer. This cream is for combination skin, so next time I will try the other one in the range, which is the shea ultra-rich comforting face cream with a higher percentage of shea butter, which makes it better for dry skin.

If I were having a particularly dry day, I’d probably reach for something more heavy-duty, but I love this light, fresh formula and would definitely recommend it. It absorbs well and is moisturising without being greasy.

My next favourite was the verbena foaming bath soak, which is great for anyone who loves citrus fragrances, such as lemon, as I do. It’s wonderful to relax in the lemony bubbles, and the bottle is a good size, so you get a number of uses out of it. I also like the raised design on the side.

The third thing is something that I had never seen before, the lavender relaxing roll-on. I have friends who put lavender oil on their pillows to help them relax and have a good night’s sleep, but I put this on myself instead and can smell it whichever way I’m facing. The roll-on action means that you don’t end up wasting oil or getting soaked in it if too much comes out at once.

You can see a picture of the shea butter hand cream on this post. I’d say it’s more of a hand butter, with 20% shea butter in it. It’s thick and rich and I’d say particularly good for the winter, when your hands can get really dry. I have also taken it away with me when I’m travelling, because flying and hotel air con can have a real drying effect on your skin (travel sizes are available). There are a range of other hand creams, and this one is particularly good for those who don’t like strong scents.

The only thing that didn’t quite convince me was the almond shower oil. I love the almond scent, but find the texture a bit too rich and oily. Not so bad in the shower, but it leaves quite a mess in the bath, so I think I’ll stick to my shower gels! Still it was good to try something new!

New soap

As well as providing Braille labels on its products, the charitable part of L’Occitane is also involved in preventing avoidable sight loss. More than 2 million people have received ophthalmologic care thanks to the NGO programmes that the L’Occitane Foundation supports.

According to a L’Occitane press release, “L’Occitane is committed to fighting avoidable blindness around the world. To date, we have directly helped more than two million people to receive quality and sometimes sight-saving eye care.” This includes helping to fund the Orbis Flying Eye hospital, which travels the globe, providing sight-saving eye operations in developing countries, and giving practical training to health professionals. During the last 16 years, L’Occitane has contributed around £1,386,000 to support the work of Orbis.

I haven’t actually tried this soap, but I wanted to mention it because it’s raising money for a good project. If you buy the shea milk solidarity soap, 100% of the profits (excluding taxes and transport costs) will be donated to NGOs dedicated to fighting preventable blindness.

Final thoughts and question for you!

I like the idea of Braille labels. I wouldn’t say they’re a necessity, as I do label things myself, and try not to buy too many things that feel the same for use at any one time, but if I like the products, the Braille labels would definitely be a reason to buy them, and I love the fact that L’Occitane have decided to do this.

I’d recommend trying out some of these products, whether or not you’re visually impaired, but if you are, this is the only skincare company I know of that produces Braille labels, and I definitely enjoyed being able to read what was in the products. If you have any friends who can read Braille, these products would make a lovely gift.

Also, I like the fact that L’Occitane works to prevent avoidable blindness. If I had the chance, I would want to be able to see. My eye condition needs a lot more research before this is possible, but I am happy to support a company that is working to enable other people to see.

This post contains PR samples. All opinions are my own.

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Author: englishwithkirsty

I provide customised, one-to-one English lessons for adults online. I am based in London and I work primarily with German speakers as I also speak German Fluently.

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