Our visit to the Ice Bar in Amsterdam

Our visit to the ice bar in Amsterdam – how it felt and my cool four-legged friends!

There is an ice bar in London and years ago I had intended to go there with some friends, but I had to pull out at the last minute.

When I was looking for things for us to do in Amsterdam, I discovered that there was an ice bar there too, so I added the Xtracold Ice Bar to my list of suggestions!

We went at the beginning of December, so we were already dressed quite warmly, but you also have to wear a special jacket and gloves when you go inside to make sure that you don’t get too cold because it’s minus 10 degrees in there!

Inside the bar, everything is made of ice – the walls, the bar, the furniture and some “cool” sculptures!

I think my favourite part was the polar bear ice statues, which had been carved out of blocks of ice. I liked the fact that they were tactile and you could feel the details of the head, ears, muzzle and big paws! I even took my glove off to feel how smooth he was, and I was very happy that my hand didn’t stick to him!

The bar is based on the experience of Dutch explorer Willem Barrentsz, who was stranded on the island Nova Zembla in the Arctic for 9 months.

In the ice bar, you can get either vodka and orange or just orange (I had just orange juice because I don’t like vodka), and it comes in glasses that are made of ice. They are very thick, presumably so they don’t melt, and it’s a funny sensation to be drinking out of ice glasses!

There is another bar outside the “freezer” and your ticket entitles you to a beer or a cocktail there as well. We had cocktails, which were very good!

I try to look for things to do that have some kind of sensory experience, and sitting in a bar at minus 10 degrees definitely ticked this box. You stay there for a limited time so you don’t get too cold, and to keep the flow of people moving. It’s a fun thing to do and I would recommend it to anyone else who wants to brave the cold! Having said that, it is cold, but not uncomfortably so. I felt worse when I locked myself out of the house in the middle of winter and had to wait in the snow for a friend to come and rescue me! So although it’s cold, the experience is more about appreciating the room made of ice.

Other Amsterdam posts

If you’d like to find out what else we did in Amsterdam, I’ve also written about the cheese tasting event that we attended, and our visit to Anne Frank’s house.

How about you?

Have you been to an ice bar? What did you think of it? Do you have any other tips for us for when we go back to Amsterdam?

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Anne Frank’s house

I read Anne Frank’s diary when I was about 13 years old. I was old enough to understand the seriousness of the story, but it was only when, around 20 years later, I stood in the rooms where Anne and her family, plus four other people, had gone into hiding during the Second World War, that I began to get a glimpse of how cramped and terrifying life must have been for them.

If you want to go to Anne Frank’s house during a visit to Amsterdam, you really have to book in advance because the tickets sell out very quickly.

My partner and I went there in May. There are audio devices that you can borrow, which are activated when you are in the correct area. This meant that my boyfriend had to take me to the activation points, but I didn’t need to do anything to the device to make it work. The explanations and diary extracts were available in a number of languages. There is also information to read and there are some artifacts to look at in the various rooms.

It’s a self-guided tour and you are let in in groups so that the building doesn’t become too full. My partner guided me around. It’s fine for a relatively fit blind person, but anyone with restricted mobility may find the steep steps difficult. Throughout the tour, there is information about the life of the Frank family before, during and after their time in hiding, and part of the story is told through extracts from Anne’s diary, which range from descriptions of everyday happenings, to her deepest thoughts, hopes and fears.

Anne Frank was born in Germany, where she lived with her parents and older sister Margot until 1933, when the family moved to the Netherlands, following concerns about Hitler’s rise to power. They felt safe there for a short time, but the sense of freedom was short-lived because Germany invaded the Netherlands in 1940 and life became increasingly difficult for Jewish people there too.

One of the things that struck me was that the family didn’t suddenly find themselves in a situation where they needed a place to hide. Things were getting progressively worse. Anne listed a number of things in one of her earlier diary entries such as Jewish people weren’t allowed to ride the tram, use swimming pools, be outside after a certain time, visit the houses of non-Jewish people etc. So it was a creeping misery. Maybe, in the beginning, some people thought it would never end in a situation where people were fleeing for their lives or looking for somewhere to hide. But it did. If you don’t stand up to bullies, unfairness, or smaller injustices, they gain power and momentum until people really are powerless to stop them. I think there’s a lesson in there for us, too.

When Anne’s older sister Margot was called up to be sent to a German labour camp, Otto Frank, Anne’s dad, and the only survivor of the eight people who went into hiding together, decided to take his family into hiding with the help of his employees.

I am someone who needs time alone. Not time away from my partner, but time away from lots of people in general. If I don’t get it, I can become grumpy. And yet day after day, these 8 people were in that small series of rooms, with nowhere to go. No opportunities to go outside for a walk. Nowhere to get away.

Not only that, but they had to entrust their survival to complete strangers. I don’t just mean the people who were keeping them alive by bringing provisions, but they had to trust each other. No flushing the toilet during the daytime. No loud noises. NO accidentally letting a door slam shut. No dropping things on the floor. What about in the summertime if people got hay fever? No sneezing! Doing any of these things could have resulted in them all being found and captured. Trusting family members and complete strangers with your life like that must have been really hard on the nerves.

The family of four, plus four other people, hid in this small series of rooms behind a slidable bookcase for two years, until they were discovered on 4th August 1944. It is not known how they were discovered or if someone betrayed them. They were first deported to a transit camp and then sent on to the concentration camp at Auschwitz. Anne later died of typhus in the concentration camp at Bergen-Belsen.

Anne wanted her diary to be published after the war, and in 1947, her father made sure that this wish came true. Now it has been translated into more than 60 languages and has been read by children and adults all over the world.

As we came out, we were immediately back in the world of parties and happy people having fun. The loud hustle and bustle of a city full of people enjoying themselves. Such a stark contrast to the place that we had just left behind. It made me want to go out and enjoy life because life is so precious, whilst at the same time not forgetting what we had just witnessed. How persecution of people based on race or religious belief can lead to such misery and cruel loss of life.

I haven’t tried this because it is a visual presentation, but you can apparently move around a 3d presentation of the house here.

Have you read the diary of Anne Frank?

Amsterdam

Have you been to Amsterdam? What did you do there?

Click on the link if you want to find out about the cheese tasting event that we attended in Amsterdam on a previous visit.

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ested this because it’s a visual presentation, but apparently you can look inside the Anne Frank house on this page